Changing role of human resource management

Strategy, Supply and Demand, Marketing, Design: It was considered a paper-pusher job, and often took a backseat to more numbers-oriented departments like marketing and business development. In conjunction with succession planning and data analytics, it is now the responsibility of HR to create better processes and training protocols. Supply and demand For any business to succeed, it must attract and retain top talent in its field.

Changing role of human resource management

Work in the 21st Century: May Terranova Consulting Group There are an incredible number of pressures on today's organizations. To name a few: Within these pressured organizations, there is a need for and opportunity for the human resource function Changing role of human resource management play a critical role in helping organizations navigate through these transitions.

In order to play this role, however, HR will have to increase its real and perceived value. The role of human resources has been evolving for some time.

HR as a Strategic Partner

The shift from "personnel" to "human resources," for example, was part of the movement to acknowledge the value of employees as an organizational resource, and was an attempt to remove some of the stigma that was coming to be associated with slow, bureaucratic personnel departments. This shift in label was accompanied by a call for HR to become a strategic partner with the leaders of the business-to contribute to significant business decisions, advise on critical transitions, and develop the value of the employees-in short, to have a seat at the table.

He describes a multi-faceted approach to delivering HR services that meets the needs of both employees and employers, and positions HR as a significant contributor to organizational success. Ulrich presents his approach in terms of deliverables, or outcomes, for which HR should be responsible: In the course of delivering in these four areas, he describes four corresponding roles for HR to play within a business: One of unique things about Ulrich's approach is that it is includes all of the ways that HR can deliver value to an organization, rather than shifting focus from one area to another.

Similarly, Johnson describes his experiences in executive search in which CEOs describe the HR leaders they want to hire. They want people who will be successful business partners, strategic thinkers, and people who will understand the pressures of running an effective business in today's market.

He reports that, when hiring a leader for the HR function, most CEOs ask for someone who is, "not a typical HR person," and that most of the successful candidates describe themselves that way.

This trend reflects the common perception that HR "business-as-usual" is not prepared to meet the challenges that today's businesses present. Making the shift to a new HR role will raise unique issues for every HR group that attempts it, but there are some common steps and activities that will increase the likelihood of success.

Some of these steps and activities are: As with any major change effort, a strong leader can develop a clear vision, motivate others to share that vision, and help them work toward achieving it. In order to change the role of HR in an organization, the HR leader will need to work both within the HR group and with the organizational leaders to reshape everyone's expectations of what HR can and will deliver.

The success of the change will depend upon HR's ability to meet the real needs of the organization and the credibility it develops. One of the ways that HR can provide value is to understand how changing environmental, organizational, and workforce factors will likely influence the business, anticipate the associated HR needs, and be prepared to deliver appropriate solutions to meet those needs.

By maintaining a focus on workplace trends, for instance, HR can prepare to evaluate the impact that particular changes are likely to have on an organization's people and processes, and be prepared to work with the business leaders to decide how to respond-being ahead of the curve, not behind it.

For example, one movement that is likely to have significant impact on the way people are hired, managed, and valued is that of intellectual capital.

The Changing Focus of HRM

A "new role" HR department is one that has learned about intellectual capital and its implications, evaluated the impact on current practice, and developed ideas and recommendations for changing HR practice and other business processes. An HR group that is successful in the future will likely be one that is responsive to the changing needs of its client organization.

Responsiveness in the changing world of work will require being flexible-as the organizations change, so will their needs and priorities. In addition, traditional activities and processes may not be sufficient to meet the unique needs of the future-HR leaders will likely rely on creativity of their groups to achieve effective results.

Increasing globalization of the market will create a need for both flexibility and creativity as businesses try to succeed in new locations, with a new workforce, and with new customers. Although this is not a new challenge for HR, it remains a critical one. HR is still perceived by many within today's organizations as simply a non-revenue generating function.

It is important to make apparent the value provided by working with the management team to hire the right people, manage them well, pay them appropriately, and build a working environment that encourages success. Beatty and Schneier extended the concept of delivering value within the organization by arguing that HR must deliver economic value to the customers, as well as to employees.

Here is a sampling of strategies that I have seen implemented as HR groups work to respond to environmental and organizational changes, become more valuable, and deliver results. Some companies are assigning HR employees to specific business units as a way of enabling them to develop a focused relationship with a small part of the business.

This relationship can be enforced when the HR person has a direct reporting relationship with the leader of the business unit. In these situations, the central HR group usually provides information and services to the "distributed" HR representatives, who then deliver the service personally to the business unit.

One advantage of this structure is that it fosters the flexibility and creativity mentioned above, as the local HR people can modify and tailor processes and services to meet the needs of their assigned business units.

As organizations grow by merger and acquisition, they often find themselves with multiple HR groups. These can be duplicative or complementary.

When they are duplicative, they can be subject to painful downsizing and consolidation, leaving behind a department that is unable to serve all areas of the business as well as they had been accustomed, which can, in turn, undermine the credibility of HR.The role of human resources has been evolving for some time.

The shift from "personnel" to "human resources," for example, was part of the movement to acknowledge the value of employees as an organizational resource, and was an attempt to remove some of the stigma that was coming to be associated with slow, bureaucratic personnel departments.

The function within an organisation that is focussed towards recruitment, management, and offering direction to the people of the organisation is termed as Human Resource Management (HRM).

In other words, all the processes and programs that are centred in and around people are part of the HR. Traditionally, the role of the Human Resource professional in many organizations has been to serve as the systematizing, policing arm of executive management.

Their role was more closely aligned with personnel and administration functions that were viewed by the organization as paperwork. Traditionally, the role of the Human Resource professional in many organizations has been to serve as the systematizing, policing arm of executive management.

Changing role of human resource management

Their role was more closely aligned with personnel and administration functions that were viewed by the organization as paperwork. The Changing Role of Human Resources Management The ever-changing roles within human resources management (HRM), in response to trends, are from a dynamic environment and the importance of HRM.

Technology Is Changing Human Resource Management – But Where Will It Go? I am amazed sometimes by how technology is impacting the world we live in. For example, SpaceX being so successful in reusing spaceships may not have a great impact today, but it does change the way we look at the future, and what we understand by science fiction.

The Changing Role of HR in Today's Workforce | SNHU