Epilepsy in children

URL of this page: People with epilepsy have seizures. A seizure is a sudden brief change in the electrical and chemical activity in the brain. What to Expect at Home If the doctor sent your child home with medicines, it is to help prevent more seizures occurring in your child.

Epilepsy in children

ShareCompartir Use these tips to make sure your student with epilepsy is safe and supported during the school day. Parents may feel a mix of excitement and worry as a new school year begins. This is especially true for parents of children with epilepsy and seizures who worry about safety during the school day.

Here are some tips to keep students with epilepsy safer as they start a new school year. Make a Seizure Action Plan. A Seizure Action Plan contains the essential information school staff may need to know in order to help a student who has seizures.

It includes information on first aid, parent and health care provider contact information, and medicines that may need to be taken during the school day.

Read the Ideas for Parents fact sheet [2. Help school staff get trained. Managing Students with Seizures for School Nurses teaches school nurses how to care for students with seizures and train other school staff.

It is available online or in person. Seizure Training for School Personnel teaches school staff teachers, office staff, bus drivers, and others to recognize seizures, provide first aid, and understand how epilepsy may affect a student.

Epilepsy in children

Seizure Training for Childcare Personnel teaches childcare providers how to recognize seizures and provide seizure first aid for young children. It is available in person through your local EF affiliate. Use these tips to make sure your child with epilepsy has the support she needs at school.

Help other students understand epilepsy.

Epilepsy in children

CDC also supports the EF to deliver epilepsy education programs that teach students about epilepsy and first aid. Take Charge of the Facts is for high school-aged students. Children can learn what a seizure looks like, facts about epilepsy, about stigma and bullying, and how to provide seizure first aid.

Parents of teens may have specific concerns about how epilepsy is managed as they become more independent. Parents can use the toolkit on their own or lead a support group.Epilepsy affects all ages groups.

But for children, a variety of issues exist that can affect one's childhood. Some epilepsy ends after childhood. Some forms of epilepsy are associated only with conditions of childhood that cease once a child grows up. Approximately 70% of children who have epilepsy during their childhood eventually outgrow it.

There are also some seizures, such as febrile. The siblings of children with epilepsy, even very young kids, may notice things about the seizures that parents may not. Also, you may want to keep a video camera handy so that you can tape your.

The siblings of children with epilepsy, even very young kids, may notice things about the seizures that parents may not. Also, you may want to keep a video camera handy so that you can tape your. If the doctor sent your child home with medicines, it is to help prevent more seizures occurring in your child.

The medicine can help your child avoid having seizures, but it does not guarantee that seizures will not occur. The doctor may need to change the dosage of your child's seizure drugs or. Epilepsy is a brain condition that causes a child to have seizures. It is one of the most common disorders of the nervous system.

It affects children and adults of all races and ethnic backgrounds. Common causes of childhood seizures or epilepsy include fever (these are called febrile seizures) genetic causes head injury infections of the brain and its coverings lack of oxygen to the brain hydrocephalus (excess water in the brain cavities) disorders of brain development Most seizures in childhood are not associated with a definite cause, however.

Seizures and Epilepsy in Children | Johns Hopkins Medicine Health Library